Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Lego Geometry









I made up Lego Geometry to get my nephew excited about area and perimeter. Kids can create big areas by putting legos side by side, or find the area of single bricks. Tell kids not to stress if bricks don't fit perfectly on the grid paper. They can round up. Have them color the area of each of their legos on their grid paper. (Note: For younger kids, you can have them count the lego studs / dots on top to find area and perimeter).



14 comments:

  1. Found you via Pinterest! Most assuredly doing this today! :)

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  2. Could you possibly add a grid paper template?

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    Replies
    1. Free printable grid paper (all sizes):

      http://activityvillage.co.uk/grid_papers.htm

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    2. Foi bem colocado seu comentário, serviu pra mim, para aplicar com meus alunos na sala de aula, muito bom!
      abç! Eliana - sotej@ig.com.br

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  3. Lego scale grid paper - http://www.apotome.com/grids/ULBG_Design_Grid_2.pdf

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  4. OOOH, I love everything on your blog! I found you through a guest blogger (Kate from Purely Paperless) who talked about your site on by blog...I am your newest follower :)
    Tracey
    The Teacher’s Chair
    Find me on Facebook!
    Happy Pinning!

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  5. Oh man these activities are great! I can't wait to use all these Legos!

    Gabrielle
    Teaching Special Thinkers

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  6. Hi, love this!

    We used to use lego in place of quisinaire length rods when my son was younger.

    More recently Ive revisited this idea, and added it to my web app GridMaths.com
    If you happen to be stuck for gridpaper, this has some nice extras and works on iPad, Chrome, Firefox.

    It has some other nice things like counting beans, you can use it do do long multiplication, by putting a digit in each grid square. Its handy when you want to explain multiplication as rectangle area and introduce Distributive Rule etc.

    Enjoy, would love your feedback as we make GridMaths more useful.

    demo : GridMaths.com
    info : quantblog.wordpress.com

    bests,

    gord.

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    Replies
    1. Awesome web 2.0 tool! I'll share a link to it on E is for Explore.
      Thanks!
      Erin Bittman

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  7. Hi Erin,
    Do you also blog here? http://bestactivitiesforkids.com/lego-math/

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  8. Just a thought: If you let the younger kids count the dots/studs on the Lego to find the area and perimeter, they are going to incorrectly assume that the area of an object will always be the same as its perimeter. This could cause a lot of confusion down the road.

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